How Long Are Wedding Videos?

How long are wedding videos? What should they include? What do I even ask my wedding videographer? 

Okay, *breathe*.

Yes, wedding planning can get stressful, but let’s break this whole wedding video thing down so you can get the footage you want with confidence. 

Our world is charging ahead into the video realm. With YouTube, Reels, TikTok, and all of the other video forward spaces, we’re starting to communicate more than ever through video. So what does that mean for you?

Well, it might mean you want your wedding day story told through video as well as photos. 

I’m guessing you do since you’re here. 

But perhaps you’re in over your head. I mean, you know the deal with photos, but where do you even start with a wedding video?

How Long Are Wedding Videos

Types of Wedding Videos

The first step is to figure out what type of wedding video you’d like. There are four main types of wedding videography, and they all deliver a different experience.

Choose your wedding video package based on how you’d like to experience your wedding day after it’s long gone.

Also, the average wedding video length differs depending on which style you choose, so let’s get into the deets so you can make the best decision. 

Highlights

guests throwing confettis on newlyweds
Photo by: Lavinia + Louise Creative Company

The average duration for a highlights wedding video is 3-5 minutes, making it the shortest option of the bunch. With a highlights video, you’ll only be getting the best of the best from the wedding ceremony. 

That is, after all, the main event of the day. 

This is also most likely to be the friendliest for your wedding budget. But with a top-notch wedding videographer, you’ll still get a beautifully edited video with transitions, music, and possibly a voiceover. 

Though it will only be a few minutes long, it’ll be sure to capture your full attention.

Short Film

minimalistic wedding theme
Photo by: Jaymi Nichole Visuals

Next up is the short film with an average length of about 7-10 minutes.

It’s enough to pack in plenty of memorable moments throughout your day, and it’s the perfect length to share with your family and friends over social media. 

Your videographer will condense hours of wedding footage into a beautifully digestible video that will encapsulate the event. It will feel authentic and candid, though it should be expertly edited. 

Documentary

reflection of bride and groom kissing in mirror
Photo by: Lavinia + Louise Creative Company

Then we have the documentary-style wedding video, which is typically 60-90 mins.

This is something you’ll really have to sit down to watch. It will highlight you, your wedding vows, the wedding parties, special moment after special moment, and it may include interviews with the people you love the most. 

There is also plenty of room in this style to include some magical moments that lead up to the big day. Maybe some raw footage of your proposal or bits and pieces of your dating story. 

Cinematic

mother of bride fixing her gown
Photo by: Jenni O Photography

The cinematic-style wedding video holds nothing back. It’s a 60 – 120 minute feature film about you, the wedding couple. 

It’s going to have all the dramatic elements. We’re talking aerial views, slow motion, voiceover, narration, dialogues, and those buttery smooth transitions. 

It will truly be a movie. 

What to Include

mother assisting bride in her long gown
Photo by: Wonderstruck Media Co

Once you figure out what style of wedding video makes sense for your big day, then you’ll have to start deciding what to include. 

Think about where it will be shared and with whom. If you mainly want your video to live on social, then a highlight version or short film might be perfect. 

If you’re looking to have a sit-down movie night to take it all in, then the documentary or cinematic might be your jam. 

Obviously, you’ll have to get much clearer on your priorities if you’re going with a highlight than if you’re investing in a cinematic. 

Figure out the story you want to be told. How do you want to feel when you look back years, or even decades, from now. If you end up having kids, what do you want them to experience from this video?

You’re going to have to sit down and do a bit of thinking on your priorities to figure out which moments are crucial for you to capture. 

Some general things to include might be:

  • Details
  • Getting ready
  • First Look
  • Ceremony/vows/first kiss
  • Reception events
  • Speeches

This is clearly not an exhaustive list, but it might get the creative juices flowing. Think about what elements are going to bring your video to life for you, and let that lead.

Budget

bride and groom posing outside tiny house
Photo by: Jessica Maddela Photography

As I said, the longer the video, the more you’ll be able to include. Don’t forget, though, the longer the video, the more expensive it will be. 

You most likely have a budget you’d like to stick within. Hold true to that. 

Find a few wedding videographers that you love and take a look at their wedding video packages. Consider the cost and see where your budget lands. 

Don’t be afraid to talk with your videographer about your budget. Maybe they could cater a package that precisely fits your needs. 

Not every wedding videographer will do this, but it doesn’t hurt to ask!

Questions for Your Videographer

Ready to move forward, but not sure what to ask your videographer during your first meeting? 

Making sure you hire the right videographer for you is crucial. There are endless creative styles in video production, so make sure you’ve watched a few videos shot by this team. 

If you like their style, here are some basic questions to start your conversation:

Do You Price by Hour or by Package?

There are a couple of different ways of pricing wedding videography. Some do by the hour and some by package. Make sure you know what your videographer does!

There’s a lot that goes into creating a wedding video. Filming hours of raw footage and then editing and condensing that into a beautiful, cohesive story takes time and plenty of talent. 

So don’t forget, the work your videographer is doing on your wedding day is only a tiny part of what goes into the final product. 

How Long Will It Take To Get the Video?

Different videographers work within different timelines, so make sure you are clear on what you can expect. Again, a highlight video may have a quicker turnaround time vs. a cinematic video, so keep that in mind. 

What Are Your Available Dates?

You’re going to want to clear this one up ASAP. Unless you’re willing to change dates for your videographer, this will make or break whether you can work with some people. 

Make sure they’re even available for your wedding date before you get too far into the discussion. 

What Is Your Videography Style?

Again, you should have watched some of the videos in their portfolio already, but it doesn’t hurt to ask directly and allow them to describe their style. 

It can help to either solidify your desire to work with them, or it might make you realize you’re not a great fit. 

What Do You Typically Cover at a Wedding?

Figure out their baseline. They might cover many things you may have not even thought to include. But, inevitably, there will be important things (to you) that didn’t make their list. 

Review their priorities, and then add your own. 

Is Editing Included?

You might assume that you’ll get a full-edited wedding video delivered after your big day, but you need to ensure that editing is included in the price you’re paying. 

Receiving a lump of raw footage will be a huge let-down if you’re expecting something more finessed. 

Make sure you and your videographer are on the same page regarding the final deliverables. That way you can make sure all expectations are met. 

Know That Your Memories Will Always Be Carefully Preserved

When you hire the right wedding videographer and choose the right style of video for you, you can rest assured that your memories will live on beautifully. 

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